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New study classifies congenital birth defects in various dog breeds
"We expect the results of this study to change the way radiologists report these birth defects" - RVC

Research marks an important step in the diagnosis and treatment of portosystemic shunts.

The Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has published a new study into the classification of congenital birth defects that occur in various dog breeds.

Writing in the journal Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, researchers provide the exact characterisation of congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IHPSS) in dogs, which has historically lacked a complete anatomical overview.
  Researchers hoped that the findings will aid in the diagnosis of IHPSS and lead to the development of new treatments.

Dr Randi Drees, associate professor in veterinary diagnostic Imaging at the RVC, said: “The newly introduced classification of the IHPSS based on the individual hepatic venous structure that it inserts through will likely be more reliable than the historical global classification system, as it relies on given anatomical structures that can be investigated with advanced imaging modalities such as angiographic computed tomography, illustrating the deficiencies of the traditional approach.
"

She added: "We expect the results of this study to change the way radiologists report these birth defects, and therefore optimise communication with the surgeons, improving overall patient care."

The research was conducted at the Royal Veterinary College’s (RVC) Queen Mother Hospital for Animals in collaboration with the School of Veterinary Medicine in Davis; the University of Tennessee Small Animal Hospital; and the College of Veterinary Medicine in Georgia.

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Born Free video highlights how humans are to blame for COVID-19

News Story 1
 Wildlife charity Born Free has released a video emphasising the importance of changing the ways in which humans treat wildlife in order to prevent pandemics from occurring in the future.

The video, narrated by founder patron Joanna Lumley OBE, says: "To deal with the very immediate threat of another global catastrophe, we have to focus on ending the destruction and conversion of natural habitats and the devastating impact of the wildlife trade.

"The vast majority of these viruses originated in wild animals before infecting us. Destroying and exploiting nature puts us in closer contact with wildlife than ever before."

Born Free has compiled an online resource with information on how to take action and improve protections for wildlife here.

To view the video, please click here.

Images (c) Jan Schmidt-Burbach. 

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RVC opens 2021 Summer Schools applications

The Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has opened applications for its 2021 Summer Schools, with students in Years 10, 11 and 12 invited to apply.

Taking place between July and August 2021, the event gives budding vets from all backgrounds first-hand insight into what it's like to study at the Campus.

Much of this year's content is likely to be delivered virtually, including online lectures and practical demonstrations, but the RVC hopes to welcome each of the participants to campus for at least one day to gain some hands-on experience.

For more information about the Schools and to apply, visit: rvc.uk.com/SummerSchools Applications close on the 2 March 2021.